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The Biggest Bluff By Maria Konnikova
by Maria Konnikova

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Teaches many lessons on importance of strategy and how to psychologically handle yourself but the conclusion point seems off from the message

Magic Treehouse Camelot
by Osborne Mary Pope

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I love magic tree house and how Jack and Annie travel to places and learn new things

This Book Is Antiracist
by Tiffany Jewell

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While anti-racist literature is (rightfully) increasing in popularity given the current racial justice movement, I feel like this book is under-hyped. I found this work to be incredibly accessible, easy-to-follow, self-reflective, inclusive, and candid. Tiffany Jewell, a Black biracial author, skillfully breaks down anti-racism into 20 preliminary starting lessons. After each lesson, she includes an activity for the reader to do in order for him/her/them to learn more about his/her/themself. If you read this book, I strongly recommend that you do the activities. The activities helped me become more aware of myself as a person and the institutions that surround me. Not that this matters but I now know a few coined terms, "Karen" and "Becky."

John
by In the Bible

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Great application for focusing on our eternity in heaven , not daily struggles

John
by In the Bible

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Great application for focusing on our eternity in heaven , not daily struggles

Nickel Boys
by Colson Whitehead

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** spoiler alert ** To find out that this is based on a real story of a reform school for the juvenile is betting heartbreaking and appalling. The ending leaves me wanting to know more about the boy who's now a man with his own business.

Magic Treehouse Camelot
by Osborne Mary Pope

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I love magic tree house and how Jack and Annie travel to places and learn new things

The Gentleman's Guide To Vice And Virtue
by Mackenzi Lee

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The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue follows Henry "Monty" Montague, a young man who loves gambling, drinking, and sex. He embarks on his Grand Tour of Europe with his best friend, Percy, whom he has a huge crush on, and his younger sister Felicity, an intelligent and headstrong young woman. Monty expects the trip to entail tons of fun and consequence-free debauchery. But when he makes a rash decision early on in their trip, the trio's journey turns a lot more sinister, forcing Monty to confront some devastating challenges, including his feelings for Percy. I liked a lot of things about this novel. Mackenzi Lee paces the plot super well, such that I always wanted to know what would happen next. Amidst a literary landscape filled with insta-love and/or unhealthy relationships, I found Monty and Percy's connection adorable, sexy, and believable. Lee shows enough of their backstory and their current chemistry to make readers root for them. I also appreciated how she addressed issues of white privilege, sexism, abuse, and stigma surrounding illness within this book. I sense that I would give this book five stars instead of four if Lee had gone a little deeper, either with Monty's character or some of the social justice topics. Monty is pretty awful throughout the book, in that he makes ignorant comments and lacks the ability to communicate his emotions. This latter fault drives a lot of the conflict in his relationship with Percy. Thus, I wish we could have seen more of Monty's process in working through his privileges, his past ignorant remarks, his issues with communication, etc. I get that Lee may have spent that time more on the adventure-based aspects of the plot, though.

To Kill A Mockingbird
by Harper Lee

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To Kill A Mockingbird is a classic novel that greatly expresses themes of racism and prejudice. Harper Lee, the author of this story clearly depicts the point of view of a little girl named Scout experiencing a world in which social inequality is dominant. In the book, readers see Atticus Finch's role model upon his children and Scout's story about coming of age.

Unmarriageable
by Soniah Kamal

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When you are reading a book and you get to the part where the title starts to make sense..."In Wickaam’s case, she’d been favorably biased, and in Darsee’s unfavorably prejudiced." ** spoiler alert ** This is another retelling of Pride and Prejudice which is a story that just can't seem to get enough of.  Everyone who knows me, knows how I usually despise the mother. I don’t know why when I read this rendition, it was one of the few where I didn’t despise the mother so much. I think that was my problem with the original Pride and Prejudice, I had prejudice against the mother. As I read this, this odd the first time I didn’t have such a disdain for her. I’m getting better at this. ;)


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